Book ID: CBB607854509

Exploring Victorian Travel Literature: Disease, Race and Climate (2014)

unapi

This interdisciplinary study explores both the personal and political significance of climate in the Victorian imagination. It analyses foreboding imagery of miasma, sludge and rot across non-fictional and fictional travel narratives, speeches, private journals and medical advice tracts. Well-known authors such as Joseph Conrad are placed in dialogue with minority writers such as Mary Seacole and Africanus Horton in order to understand their different approaches to representing white illness abroad. The project also considers postcolonial texts such as Wilson Harris’s Palace of the Peacock to demonstrate that authors continue to ‘write back’ to the legacies of colonialism by using images of climate induced illness.

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Reviewed By

Review David N. Livingstone (2015) Review of "Exploring Victorian Travel Literature: Disease, Race and Climate". Social History of Medicine (pp. 937-938). unapi

Citation URI
http://data.isiscb.org/isis/citation/CBB607854509/

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Authors & Contributors
Jankovic, Vladimir
Behrendt, Stephen D.
Luedke, Tracy
Vogel, Brant Montgomery
Hulme, Mike
Macadam, Joyce
Journals
Nature
Journal of Southern African Studies
Osiris: A Research Journal Devoted to the History of Science and Its Cultural Influences
Science as Culture
Journal of Interdisciplinary History
Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
Publishers
Palgrave Macmillan
University of Chicago Press
Georgetown University
Scrimgeour Yorkshire
Routledge
Yale University Press
Concepts
Climate and climatology
Medicine and culture
Colonialism
Environmental sciences
Medicine
Earth sciences
People
Callendar, Guy Stewart
Gore, Albert
Kröpelin, Stefan
Places
Africa
England
Americas
Germany
Atlantic Ocean
Mozambique
Times
19th century
20th century
18th century
17th century
21st century
20th century, late
Institutions
Royal Society of London
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