Article ID: CBB180761412

Imagining future agricultural landscapes in a new Sudan: Entitled expertise, cultural intransience and fine warm rain in the English wilds (2020)

unapi

This article responds to work on development-centred technical and scientific expertise at the decline of the British empire in Africa. It focuses on the imagining of future agricultural landscapes in Sudan, exploring how such imagining was framed by the social and colonial worlds in which scientific knowledge about agricultural capacity in the north and south was produced. It draws on a private archive of letters, photographs and objects compiled by Roger Brain, an agricultural scientist engaged in research and census work for the University of Khartoum in Sudan between 1953 and 1959. His archive reveals the underlying assumptions, conventions and anxieties that framed the ways in which he viewed and understood the landscapes in which he worked. I argue that this framing shaped regionalized notions of inevitable technological transformation in the north, and notions of a fragile cultural distinctiveness coupled with a deep nostalgia for rural intransience in the south.

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Authors & Contributors
Carruthers, William
Park, Sub
Tully, John A.
Schnurr, Matthew A.
Kimmelman, Barbara A.
Underwood, Martin C.
Journals
History of Physics Newsletter
Historia Scientiarum: International Journal of the History of Science Society of Japan
Journal of World History
Journal of Historical Geography
Mendel Newsletter
Agricultural History
Publishers
Harvard University Press
Duke University Press
Lexington Books
Alfred A. Knopf
Cornell University Press
Concepts
Agriculture
Imperialism
Personal archives
Colonialism
Cross-cultural interaction; cultural influence
Great Britain, colonies
People
Goudsmit, Samuel Abraham
Rotblat, Joseph
Hamilton, William Donald
Places
India
Great Britain
Africa
Europe
Sudan
Korea
Times
20th century, early
19th century
20th century, late
20th century
18th century
Qing dynasty (China, 1644-1912)
Institutions
American Institute of Physics
Niels Bohr Library
UNESCO
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