Book ID: CBB001422481

Victorian Literature and the Physics of the Imponderable (2015)

unapi

Alexander, Sarah C. (Author)


Pickering & Chatto


Publication Date: 2015
Physical Details: 224 pp.
Language: English

The Victorians were obsessed with the empirical but were frequently frustrated by the sizeable gaps in their understanding of the world around them. This study examines how literature and popular culture adopted the emerging language of physics to explain the unknown or `imponderable'. Writers such as Charles Dickens, William Morris and Joseph Conrad used recent concepts such as energy, entropy and atom theory to explore key issues of capitalism, imperialism and social unrest. In doing so, they created a fresh vocabulary, helping to make sense of the new experiences of modernity.

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Reviewed By

Review Ian Hesketh (2016) Review of "Victorian Literature and the Physics of the Imponderable". Isis: International Review Devoted to the History of Science and Its Cultural Influences (pp. 868-869). unapi

Citation URI
https://data.isiscb.org/isis/citation/CBB001422481/

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Authors & Contributors
Hale, Piers J.
Buckland, Adelene
Tondre, Michael L.
Winyard, Ben
Furneaux, Holly
Connor, Steven
Journals
19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century
Victorian Literature and Culture
Nineteenth-Century Contexts
Journal of the History of Biology
Journal of Medical Biography
Mariner's Mirror
Publishers
MIT Press
Cambria Press
University of Chicago Press
Pickering & Chatto
University of Chicago
Stanford University
Concepts
Science and literature
Thermodynamics
Popular culture
Science and culture
Entropy
Evolution
People
Dickens, Charles
Morris, William
Conrad, Joseph
Wells, Herbert George
Shaw, George Bernard
Lyell, Charles
Time Periods
19th century
20th century, early
20th century
Places
Great Britain
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